Nation chipping in for those in need

The current crisis have brought up the best and worst out of people. I’m happy to see that most of the cases it’s been kindness and selflessness which have been spreading across the country more rapidly than the virus. Since moving to UK I’ve always been amazed by the large scale of charity work happening all around the nation and I’m delighted to see how many are willing to chip in for those in need especially when the times are more challenging than in a long long time. I’ve never witnessed the same willingness to help others in Finland as here in UK. Actually it’s been said that Finns would be willing to pay to make sure their neighbours wouldn’t get any money. Unfortunately I don’t think that’s far from the truth.

The charity work is a big part of the culture over here and it took me a while to get to used to that. I remember one occasion when I was still working in Finland and me and my colleague asked our HR manager who was based in UK if the company would sponsor a team joining for a run. The HR manager asked us for which cause the run is raising money for and we were just thinking, why would there be any fundraising involved, it’s just a running event. What I quickly discover when being closer to the life in UK, there’s no run or probably any event which doesn’t include some sort of charity work. My previous company had a pretty large intern program in place and one of the key element of that program was all the interns coming together and find ways to raise at least £10k for charity during their 13 months internship.

Captain Tom and other heroes raising money for NHS and people in need

While the news threads are filled up with number of deaths and other terrible news it’s now more important than ever to find good and cheerful news. I’m a person who follows the news a lot even when there isn’t a pandemic in place and while working from home I have news on almost non-stop (well at least until the game shows starts in the afternoon). It was BBC who introduced me to Tom Moore for the first time and as so many others I wanted to support his cause to raise money for NHS. All the sudden instead of looking at the latest death rates the big focus switched to see how much money have been raised for NHS. The fundraising is on until Thursday (30th April 2020) when Tom’s 100th birthday is taking place. What’s been heartwarming as well is all the tens of thousands of kids who have made and sent birthday cards to this recently discovered hero for his 100th birthday.

Captain Tom is definitely not the only on raising money for a good cause and you can find so many amazing challenges people are doing just to support others in need. It’s truly inspirational to hear about these magnificent gestures people are coming up when the need is bigger than ever and I sure want to support as many of them as I can afford myself. Good news can lift your spirit a lot and to cope with the current circumstances you need all the uplifts there are available!

Support the businesses impacted by Covid-19

Since begin of the pandemic it’s been important for both me and Milla to try to support the business around as. It’s important to keep some money flowing to ease the pain a lot of the business are currently feeling. Travel businesses are exceptionally vulnerable at the moment and I’d advise to think twice before refusing to accept a voucher and going for a money refund instead. Cash flow is a severe problem for these companies and unless you’re in an urgent need for cash and you’re absolutely certain you’re not going to travel ever again then there can be a point for getting your money back immediately. Demanding to get your cash back straight away will put the companies in a bigger risk and many of them may not survive the pressure. My advise applies to other purchases as well. Is it really catastrophe if you won’t get that money back for that purchased ticket to a play or concert which you already spend several months ago if it can help businesses not to go to a bankrupt?

It’s good that the governments have their own programs to support the businesses. I’m in lucky situation and don’t need to apply for any support myself so I’m not 100% with the requirements needed for getting a financial support. As I follow closely media in both UK and Finland I’ve definitely seen some differences how the public reacts to the financial reliefs the companies are getting. In UK the criticism around companies taking part of the governments Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is limited and those brought out have a valid point. Why would a football club for instance should ask government to pay 80% of their low-skill workers salaries when at the same time they continue to pay millions to their players even when the season is paused. Or if the company owner’s assets are out of this world, couldn’t he/she use some of his/hers own money to help the business go on rather than using the tax payers money.

However the atmosphere in Finland is pretty different. I’m utterly disgusted and disappointed of some of the news I read and I really can’t understand why so many are attacking the companies and their founders just because they applied and got financial support. First of all, I don’t get why the full details of the companies getting the financial support needs to public for everyone in the first place. It’s undeniable that the process have it flaws but what triggers someone to send a death threat to someone else just because they got the fund they applied for? And it’s not a just one individual who’s sending these which is very alarming. I’m sad for those entrepreneurs who had to give up the development funds they were allowed to have to save themselves from getting more death threats. I wish the media in Finland would focus more on the good stories. There’s no fundraising culture in Finland but wouldn’t this be a perfect time to start some?

Stay Safe, Be Kind, Help Others!

Ps. The flower pictures don’t really tie up with the subject however I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

Mimosa

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